Mayan Mojo Coffee and Maya Breandunt Nutmeal Flour - Natural Brosimum Alicastrum Food & Beverage

 


 

Mayan Mojo Product Information

What is....

MAYAN MOJO TM also called Ramòn, Maya Breadnut, and Maya Nut, is a member of the Mulberry Family growing in the coastal regions of Mexico, Central America and the Caribbean. The Mojo tree develops a fruit containing a single seed about one-inch in diameter that makes a delicious beverage similar to high quality coffee when roasted and ground.

Uses of MAYAN MOJO TM

When roasted, ground and brewed, MAYAN MOJO TM is a rich tasting, nutritious beverage. It has a nutty-cocoa flavor similar to high quality coffee, or when iced, a refreshing herbal tea. Mojo can be served alone or mixed with coffee, and can be prepared iced or hot. Add milk, cinnamon or sweetener to taste, if desired. The grounds can also be added to smoothies or ice cream for nutritional boost, added texture, and a nutty-cocoa taste. Available in Dark Roast or Rainforest Blend; whole or ground beans.

MAYAN MOJO TM contains protein (8%), Vitamin C (40%), Vitamin B (5%), calcium (7%),carbohydrates (8%) and Iron (8%) per 2.5 Tablespoons serving.  One tree yields over 100 pounds of nuts and a year-round supply of leaves for livestock.

History of MAYAN MOJO TM

Not since the Great Mayan civilization has Mojo been so widely available in the modern world. Mojo became a forgotten food when the Mayans declined, but rediscovered in 1890. The development of chicle (chewing gum) drove chicleros deeper into virgin forests where their mules would eagerly search out Mojo nuts and leaves growing on the steep hillsides. The large trees, sometimes growing to heights of 120 feet, thrived on the limestone soil and shrouded their hosts with evergreen foliage, hiding the secrets of the Mayan ruins for centuries.

The ancient Mayans used Mojo in a variety of ways. They stored the nuts underground as an alternate food source when crops yield was poor; they boiled them and enjoyed them with a taste and texture like potatoes; they dried and mixed Mojo with corn to make tortillas; and they enjoyed Mojo as a dessert when mixed with honey.